What We Do

 

Patrol

Educate

Advocate

Our approach to river conservation is driven by the river and its needs, not by politics and self-interest. We supplement our passion for the river with science and an understanding of policy. We get out on the water to see the river and the people who depend on it first hand. When there’s a lack of data or information about an issue on the river, we go collect samples or conduct research. In an age where major decisions made by lawmakers are based mostly in politics and not in science, we speak up for our river and ensure it is protected from greed and ignorance.

We take a watershed approach; we don’t just look at what’s happening on the lakes, we look at what’s happening on all the creeks because it all matters in the scope of a healthy river. Because the Middle and Lower Coosa River Basins in which we work are so expansive at 5,000 square miles, we prioritize our work based on the most urgent issues where we believe our approach to conservation will be most effective. The data that we collect helps guide us to the restoration and conservation efforts that will have the greatest impact.

Patrol

As part of our Riverkeeper Program, our staff Riverkeeper patrols 5 lakes and dozens of creeks in order to document both pollution and beauty and stay in tune with what’s happening on the river. We conduct extensive water quality monitoring for our Swim Guide program and our Citizen Science Monitoring program.

When we discover an issue, we seek to resolve it. That can be anything from working with state and federal agencies to remove a dam that is eroding a citizen’s stream-bank and blocking fish migration to filing legal action against a permitted polluter who refuses to comply with their pollution permit. To date, we have filed legal action on thousands of violations of the Clean Water Act at sewer plants across the Coosa Valley.

patrol coosa river

Learn More

Patrol

As part of our Riverkeeper Program, our Staff Riverkeeper patrols 5 lakes and dozens of creeks in order to document both pollution and beauty while staying in tune with what’s happening on the river. We conduct extensive water quality monitoring for our Swim Guide program.

When we discover an issue, we seek to resolve it. That can be anything from working with state and federal agencies to remove a dam that is eroding a citizen’s stream-bank and blocking fish migration to filing legal action against a permitted polluter who refuses to comply with their pollution permit. To date, we have filed legal action on thousands of violations of the Clean Water Act at sewer plants across the Coosa Valley.

Educate

Throughout our programs, we work to educate the public about the value that the Coosa River brings to our community, economy, and our environment. Our Swim Guide program provides water quality data and swim safety information so families can make informed decisions about where to safely enjoy the river. Our Fish Guide program works to educate fishermen about fish consumption advisories and fishing best practices. We educate our members and the general public about the river year-round through blog posts, newsletters, e-mail list, radio shows, newspaper articles, and events.

educate coosa river

Schedule A Presentation

Advocate

A river has a head and a mouth, but it has not a voice with which to speak in our classrooms, courtrooms and town halls. Coosa Riverkeeper advocates on behalf of the river to ensure it is spoken for when decisions that might impact it are made.

In a number of governmental decisions made every year that can impact the river, officials are required to solicit and respond to public comments. In these situations, our comments advocate for the best interests of the river and the people who use it.

advocate coosa river

Become A Member

Advocate

A river has a head and a mouth, but it does not have a voice to speak in our classrooms, courtrooms, and town halls. Coosa Riverkeeper advocates for the river to ensure it is spoken for when decisions that might impact it are made.

In a number of governmental decisions made every year that can impact the river, officials are required to solicit and respond to public comments. In these situations, our comments advocate for the best interests of the river and the people who use it.

We want 100 kids to put down their screens and pick up fishing rodsHelp us reach out $10,000 goal for Giving Tuesday!

Many folks have memories of learning how to fish from a family member or a camp. These days kids and families might not know where to start when it comes to learning how to cast, catch, and cook fish from the river. During our clinics, we will work with kids in an experiential learning style with casting lessons, discussion on responsible recreation on the river, and explain how to reduce exposure to potentially harmful contaminants through live cooking demonstrations.